Answers to Reproductive System Quiz

1.The place where a baby develops  Ans: Uterus

2 Forceful release of semen from the penis  Ans : Ejaculation

3. Time in life when a woman’s menstruation ends Ans: Menopause

4. Ducts connecting the ovaries to the uterus; fertilization takes place here (two words)  Ans: Fallopian Tubes

5. Passing of semen during sleep (two words)  Ans:  Wet Dreams

 6. Release of an egg from an ovary  Ans: Ovulation

7. Place where sperm is produced  Ans: testicle

8. A thick fluid that is discharged from the penis during ejaculation  Ans: Semen

9. The process by which a child’s body develops rapidly toward becoming an adult body and being able to reproduce Ans: Puberty

 7. Hardening of the penis  Ans: Erection

Adapted from My Changing Body, courtesy of

Institute for Reproductive Health. Its All in One Curriculum IPPF pg 134

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Reproductive System Quiz

1. The place where a baby develops
2  Forceful release of semen from the penis
3. Time in life when a woman’s menstruation ends
4. Ducts connecting the ovaries to the uterus;
fertilization takes place here (two words)
5. Passing of semen during sleep (two words)
6. Release of an egg from an ovary
7. Place where sperm is produced
8. A thick fluid that is discharged from the penis during ejaculation
9. The process by which a child’s body develops rapidly toward
becoming an adult body and being able to reproduce
7. Hardening of the penis

Adapted from My Changing Body, courtesy of Institute for Reproductive Health. <www.irh.org>

Its All in One Curriculum IPPF pg 134

Published in: on February 28, 2011 at 7:57 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Answers to Contraceptive Quiz

1) A surgical procedure that prevents the male release of sperm

Ans: Vasectomy

2) A small rod inserted in a woman or girl’s arm

Ans: Implant

3)A woman or girl takes it daily to prevent pregnancy ( common name two words)

Ans: the pill

4)An operation in which a woman’s fallopian tubes are cut or tied to prevent the egg and sperm from meeting ( two words)

Ans: tubal ligation

5). Inserted into the uterus,often shaped like a T ( abbreviation)

Ans: IUDs

7)A man or boy wears it on his penis during sex: it prevents pregnancy and protects against STIs/HIV ( tow words)

Ans: Male Condom

8)A woman applies it to her skin like a band-aid;it does not prevent against STIs/HIV ( two word)

Ans: Contraceptive Patch

 

Source: Guildelines and Activities ( For a Unified Approach to Sexuality , Gender, HIV and Human Rights Education

Published in: on February 21, 2011 at 7:10 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

Quiz on Contraceptive Methods

Here are questions to test your knowledge on contraceptive methods:

Send your anwers

1)A surgical procedure that prevents the male release of sperm

2) A small rod inserted in a woman or girl’s arm

3)A woman or girl takes it daily to prevent prgnancy ( common name two words)

4)An operation in which a woman’s fallopian tubes are cut or tied to prevent the egg and spermfrom meeting ( two words)

5). Inserted into the uterus,often shaped like a T ( abbreviation)

7)A man or boy wears it on his penis during sex: it prevents prgnancy and protects against STIs/HIV ( tow words)

8)A woman applies it to her skin like a band-aid;it does not prevent against STIs/HIV ( two word)

Will provide answers next week

Source: Guildelines and Activities ( For a Unified Approach to Sexuality , Gender, HIV and Human Rights Education

Safer Sex week ” Focusing on Sexually Transmitted Infections ( STIs)

A sexually transmitted infection (STI) is an illness that is primarily spread through sex whether through vaginal, anal or oral. With over 30 sexual transmitted infections persons need to be aware so as to protect themselves and seek treatment if they were exposed.

Facts on STIs

Your risk of getting an STI begins the first time you have

sex. The more partners you have, the greater your risk.

 You can have an STI and don’t know. Early diagnosis and treatment can either cure you or help you avoid most of the serious complications.

 In women, STIs can lead to cancer, infertility, long-term

pain, and ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy in which the

fetus grows outside the womb).

 Men can also suffer long-term problems, such as infertility,

heart disease, and arthritis.

 Mothers can pass STIs on to their babies before,

during, or after birth.

 There is no cure for STIs caused by viruses, like herpes, HPV –Human Papilloma Virus and HIV.

Common signs/symptoms of STIs

  • Itching around the vagina and/or discharge from the vagina for women
  • Discharge from the penis for men
  • Pain during sex or when urinating
  • Pain in the pelvic area
  • Sore throats in people who have oral sex
  • Pain in or around the anus for people who have anal sex
  • Chancre sores (painless red sores) on the genital area, anus, tongue and/or throat
  • A scaly rash on the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet
  • Dark urine, loose, light-colored stools, and yellow eyes and skin
  • Small blisters that turn into scabs on the genital area
  • Swollen glands, fever and body aches
  • Unusual infections, unexplained fatigue, night sweats and weight loss
  • Soft, flesh-colored warts around the genital area

Common STIs

Chlamydia

Genital herpes

Genital warts

Gonorrhoea

Hepatitis B

HIV/AIDS

Protection against STIs

The  only 100%  form of protection is abstinence . However if persons choose to be sexually active they can use these forms of protection  male condoms, female condoms and dental dams. All are used as barriers between the penis, mouth, vagina or rectum.

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Published in: on February 10, 2011 at 10:09 am  Comments (1)  

Should teenagers be allowed to access sexual and reproductive services?

With the high rates of teenage pregnancy and transmission of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) the question has to be raised about allowing teenagers to access sexual and reproductive services. In a perfect world ,abstinence  only campaigns would work but realistically speaking  we should  also make provisions for youth friendly services . This of course is not as straightforward as for adults and should come with conditions. Since in providing these services, providers would have to bear in mind the age of consent and also the repercussions if a teenager was having a relationship with an adult. The key however to all this is providing needed education about sexual and reproductive health from early so that teenagers will delay sexual encounters and when ready would have the information as to where to go to access these services.

But lets face it for teens that  are sexually active contraceptives and education should be available.  According to Advocates for Youth , family life education and services should be linked with the motivation to delay pregnancy, and early child-bearing as well as viable alternatives. So exposing teenagers to accurate information from early is our the safest bet.

Should sex education be taught in schools?

Age appropriate sex education in schools can  help to prevent issues such  unplanned pregnancies, transmission of sexually  transmitted diseases unsafe abortions and of  course expose young people to sexual and reproductive information such as cervical cancer.

 For Jamaica teenage pregnancy is still a problem and among the highest in the Caribbean. A  UNICEF report on Jamaica revealed that a child gives birth to a child in 1 out of 5 births  .Furthermore about one-third of women experiencing pregnancy between ages 15 and 24 years first conceived while in school and only 34% of adolescent mothers return to school after giving birth . The attribution as stated by UNICEF points to forced sex, transactional sex, low rate of contraceptive , early sexual initiation etc

 According to The Jamaican Guideline for Comprehensive Sexuality Education ” research supports that a comprehensive approach to sexuality information  can help young people delay intercourse , reduce frequency of partners they have and increase their use of condoms and other contraceptive methods when they become active .”

Here are two of our Facebook friends thoughts on the subject

Debbie-Ann Castle i definately think it should be taught to make the children more aware
January 19 at 12:25pm ·
  • Kelly Nowicki Absolutely. How can we expect kids to protect themselves if they don’t know the facts?
    January 19 at 8:20pm ·
  • Welcome to FAMPLAN Jamaica

    Welcome to our new blog.

    This Blog  was started initially for  a Project on HIV Prevention . As we move forward we will be adding content about matters related to sexual and reproductive health .  You can visit our Facebook Cause and Global Group to see and interact with those who have already committed to supporting the HIV issue. We would love if you leave comments for matters that you want to be discussed.

    Have you ever heard about Jadelle Implants?

    Jadelle implants is a contraceptive method which comprises of two rods which releases hormones at a controlled rate to prevent pregnancy.They are inserted in the arm  and can last from 4-5 years.

    This method is recommended for women who:

    • Women that want an effective method of contraceptive
    • Want a long-term contraceptive method
    • Prefer a method that is not taken daily nor requires re supply
    • Have the number of children that they want but do not wish to be sterilized
    • Have problems remembering to take oral contraceptives[1]

    The method is not recommended for:

    • Women with Breast Cancer within the past 5 years
    • Pregnant women
    • Smokers
    • Women over 176 pounds

    One of the most important characteristics of the Jadelle is that it is reversible. The contraceptive action stops within two to three days of removal. This alternative to Norplant is easier to insert and remove, which is an advantage for both clients and providers. The insertion and removal are done by a doctor and the patient’s medical history is also required .


    [1] International  Planned  Parenthood Federation ( Medical and Service Delivery Guidelines Third Edition 2004)

    How badly do our youth need HIV prevention services?

    HIV prevention is a topical issue for uninfected and positive young people. Knowledge and awareness of the of the magnitude of the problem among youth is essential if we are to successfully respond to the problem. The body is an excellent resource for supporting young people and those who care about them. Information on the knowledge and attitudes of young Jamaicans towards HIV/AIDS is also available online and can provide a wealth of information for practitioners who have responsibility for youth development.

    Though Jamaica is nowhere near where it needs to be in addressing HIV prevention among young people, some ground work has been done. This is evidenced in the publication of the Policy handbook for schools, the national HIV/AIDS policy, among others. Check out the following report: Adolescent HIV prevention activities, Jamaica, which provides excellent information about the actions of national leaders in improving HIV prevention services for young people in Jamaica.